Author Archive for Donald Johnson

04
Aug
09

Charles Gwathmey, of the “New York Five”, is Dead at 71

gwathmey 001

gwathmey 004

gwathmey003

NY Times obit, here.  NY Times story about the genesis of the New York Five, here:

Charlie Rose interview from 2000, here.  Starts at minute 24:00.

Top:  Gwathmey Residence and Studio – Amagansett, NY 1967

Middle:  Cooper Residence – Orleans, MA 1968

Bottom:  Solomon R. Guggenheim Renovation and Addition – New York, NY 1992

Advertisements
09
Jul
09

Vintage British High Tech

PA Tech 002

This past weekend I visited the PA Technology Center (PAT Center) in Princeton, NJ.   It’s an R&D building by architect Richard Rogers that was completed in 1982.

The high tech architecture movement had a period of popularity between the 1960’s and 1990’s.  Of the architects who practiced (and continue to practice) this genre, five are mentioned most often:  Norman Foster, Nicholas Grimshaw, Michael Hopkins, Renzo Piano, and Richard Rogers.  All except Renzo Piano are Brits.  Because of this, the movement is often called “British” high tech.

Continue reading ‘Vintage British High Tech’

03
Jun
09

From the land of “cigars and big hair”

Oppenheim Architecture + Design

oppenheim 001oppenheim 003oppenheim 004

02
Jun
09

America’s 11 Most Endangered

Trinity 002

Every year, the National Trust for Historic Preservation publishes a list of “America’s 11 Most Endangered Historic Places”.  A “Place” is broadly defined enough to include whole communities and towns, districts, individual buildings, and nature sites.  Places of all ages and styles are given consideration.  Making it on the list raises awareness of a place’s plight, with the hope that activism will lead to a happy ending, though it often doesn’t.

Trinity 001This year’s list includes Frank Lloyd Wright’s century old Unity Temple in Oak Park, IL (rendering pictured above).  The building is endangered due to massive deterioration of the structure and interiors.  Besides being the only surviving example of public architecture from Wright’s Prairie period, it is also recognized as the first building in the world built from steel reinforced poured in place concrete – a pioneering technique that is now de rigueur in modern architecture.  Unfortunately, the experimental construction did not include the use of expansion joints to relieve pressure from movement in the building shell.  Hence, the intense cracking and crumbling the building is now a victim of.

mount taylor 001

Other places on the list include the 12,000’ tall Mount Taylor in New Mexico, which sits on the largest uranium deposit in the country. 

 

 

 

 

 

Marine Stadium 001

Plus, Miami Marine Stadium that was built in 1963 using an innovative folded plate concrete structure.  The stadium was damaged by Hurricane Andrew in 1998 and has sat unrepaired ever since.

 

 

 

The current complete list can be found at the NTHP’s website, or concisely at the AIA.

Do you live near one of these or past places from the list and want to share your thoughts?  Is there value in the preservation of historic places, and how do we reconcile it with the drive to move forward?

13
May
09

Fire at Zaha’s Guangzhou Opera House

Story here.

3521890653_dd9a8f5155_o

3522997544_2339613f86_o

3522997554_7b0db29e80_o

08
May
09

Was architect E. Fay Jones a Vulcan?

“Star Trek” of course features numerous speculative renditions of a future Earth and far away planets.  But, amidst all the space age imagineering were a few scenes that featured a little chapel from present day Whittier, California – used as the setting for the Vulcan High Court.

trek-thumb

Skyrose Chapel by E. Fay Jones & Maurice Jennings, built in 1997:

Skyrose002

Skyrose001

E. Fay Jones is perhaps best known for another earlier work, Thorncrown Chapel in Eureka Springs, Arkansas, built in 1980:

 

05
May
09

I scream, you scream…

Here’s a story with a CMU connection published in this month’s Architectural Record:

With Jobs Scarce, Will Young Architects Flee the Profession?




December 2017
S M T W T F S
« Mar    
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31  

Categories

Our Flickr Photos

Our YouTube Videos

can be found here